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“It has been extremely gratifying to see the shift in Washington City toward cycling. We’ve taken one of the least supportive communities and introduced them to resources and tools that will help them.”

-Southern Utah Bicycle Alliance

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Diet, physical activity, and weight play an important role in determining an individual’s cancer risk. Maintaining recommended levels of physical activity and eating a diet filled with a variety of plant foods such as vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and beans helps lower risk for many cancers. Historically, Utah has higher fruit consumption and slightly higher vegetable consumption compared with national rates. Fruit and vegetable consumption generally are lower among those with lower education and income. Access to healthy foods and physical activity opportunities and resources can be a barrier to eating a balanced diet and being active.


Physical Activity Targets for Change

Increase the proportion of adults who are physically active as defined as “150+ min/week of at least moderate intensity, or 75+ min/week of vigorous intensity, or an equivalent combination of aerobic physical activity.”
Current data: 55.6%
58.5%Baseline
(2011-2013 BRFSS)
62%Utah 2020 Target
Data Source: BRFSS
Reduce the proportion of adults who are obese (defined as a BMI of 30 or more).
Current data: 25%
72% of Goal
26.3%Baseline
age-adjusted
(2014 BRFSS)
24.5%Utah 2020 Target
Data Source: BRFSS
Reduce the proportion of adolescents in grades 9 through 12 who are considered obese (at or above the 95th percentile for body mass index, by age and sex).
Current data: TBD
7.5%Baseline
(2011 & 2013 YRBS)
5.5%Utah 2020 Target
Data Source: YRBS

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Physical Activity Goals, Strategies and Action Steps

Goal: Increase the number of Utahns who meet current Physical Activity Guidelines.


StrategyIncrease physical activity in schools, worksites, and communities through policy, systems, and environmental change.

Who is addressing this strategy?
CU’s Shake and Zen Project
Action Steps

  • Advocate for more parks and open spaces in underserved communities.
  • Promote and support state and local policies that create environments conducive to regular physical activity.
  • Work with communities to develop active transportation plans and policies to encourage physical activity.
  • Assist underserved communities to implement policies that encourage the development and utilization of physical activity resources including affordable recreation facilities, green spaces, and parks.
  • Promote programs, such as the Safe Routes to School Program which make it safe for students to walk to and from school.
  • Collaborate with worksites and schools to implement policies that increase opportunities for employees and students to be physically active.
  • Work with underserved communities to increase social support interventions in community settings.
National Strategy Alignment: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2015). Step It Up! The Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Promote Walking and Walkable Communities. Washington, D.C.; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2008. Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. Washington, D.C; Community Preventative Services Task Force. (2014). Behavioral and Social Approaches to Increase Physical Activity: Social Support Interventions in Community Settings



Policy, Systems, and Environmental (PSE) Change Approaches for Physical Activity

Setting Non-PSE Approach PSE Approach
School Teach the benefits of physical activity in a health course. Develop a walking school bus program that makes it easy for students to walk and exercise before and after school.
Workplace Host a “get fit” challenge for employees. Develop an incentive program that encourages walking and exercising during the workday.[1]
Community Promote recreation center facilities and community classes for physical activity. Advocate for local government to develop open spaces into public parks and recreation areas that allow for increased physical activity.

Additional Resources:


Nutrition Targets for Change

Increase the proportion of adults who are at a healthy weight (defined as a BMI less than 25).
Current data: 39.3%
39.5%Baseline
age-adjusted
(2014 BRFSS)
41.5%Utah 2020 Target
Data Source: BRFSS
Increase the consumption of fruits to two or more servings per day for adolescents.
Current data: TBD
34.3%(2013 YRBS)
36%Utah 2020 Target
Data Source: YRBS
Increase the consumption of fruits to two or more servings per day for adults.
Current data: 17.3%
34.2%Baseline
age-adjusted
(2013 BRFSS)
36%Utah 2020 Target
Data Source: BRFSS

VIEW ALL DATA INDICATORS


Nutrition Goals, Strategies and Action Steps

Goal: Increase the number of Utahns who meet current Dietary Guidelines.


StrategyIncrease the access to healthy foods in schools, worksites, and communities through policy, systems, and environmental changes.

Who is addressing this strategy?
There are currently no projects in progress.
Action Steps

  • Advocate for increased access to farmer’s markets and community gardens for underserved populations.
  • Develop interventions to increase access to healthy foods in areas with little or no access such as food deserts.
  • Partner with worksites to implement healthy food policies that increase access to fruit and vegetables for employees.
  • Partner with schools and daycares to implement healthy food policies that increase access to fruit and vegetables.
  • Increase access to culturally appropriate foods.
  • Encourage the use of space for community gardens and farmer’s markets in underserved areas.
  • Partner with community supported agriculture (CSA) programs to increase access to locally grown foods.
National Strategy Alignment: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2014). Healthier Food Retail: An Action Guide for Public Health Practitioners. Atlanta, GA; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2011). Strategies to Prevent Obesity and Other Chronic Disease: The CDC Guide to Strategies to Increase the Consumption of Fruits and Vegetables. Atlanta, GA.



Policy, Systems, and Environmental (PSE) Change Approaches for Nutrition

Setting Non-PSE Approach PSE Approach
School Discuss the importance of healthy eating with students during the school day. Provide only healthy, appealing, and affordable food options in cafeterias and on school campuses that makes it easy for students to eat healthy before, during, and after school.
Workplace Challenge employees to bring healthy lunches to work. Dedicate workplace land for use as an employee garden, incentivize employees to tend the garden, and use the resulting produce in the onsite cafeteria.
Community Promote a local farmer’s market through flyers, signs, email, and newsletters. Facilitate farm-to-plate agreements between local food producers and community organizations including schools and hospitals.

Additional Resources: